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Wisbech

About Wisbech

"Market Day: Daily

Wisbech, the Capital of the Fens, is the perfect place for a day out or a break to get away from it all. There is plenty of accommodation choice, from historic town centre hotels to attractive B&Bs in rural settings and charming self catering cottages.

Wisbech is renowned for its elegant Georgian architecture, a legacy from an era when the town was a booming trade centre. Stroll along the Brinks or round the Crescent to see some fine Georgian houses. Then visit Peckover House and Gardens on North Brink, once the home of the Peckovers, a Quaker banking family, now in the care of the National Trust and open to visitors from spring to autumn three or four afternoons a week.

A little further along North Brink is a completely different example of Georgian architecture. Elgood's Brewery and Gardens was one of the first Georgian breweries to be built outside London and has stood almost unchanged for more than 200 years. You can sample some of Elgood's award winning real ales, either on a brewery tour or in one of the many Elgood's pubs in town.

For all those historians, Wisbech has two museums; the Wisbech and Fenland in the Crescent and Octavia Hill's Birthplace House on South Brink. The Wisbech and Fenland Museum is one of the oldest museums in the United Kingdom. It is very unusual because it is not only a museum, but also home to two historic libraries and a substantial archive, holding diocesan and borough items. The original manuscript of the Charles Dickens novel, Great Expectations, can also be found here. Wisbech also has one of the oldest surviving Georgian Theatres in the country. The Angles Theatre has just 112 seats and offers a variety of drama, dance and music in a cosy performance space.

Wisbech is justifiably proud of its 38 acres of open spaces. The town has achieved two Green Flag Awards for the seventh year running in 2014 for Wisbech Park and St Peter's Church Gardens, this in conjunction with its Gold Medal Winning floral displays and Best Large Town in the Anglia region and also success in Britain in Bloom in 2014, all help make the town centre a colourful and vibrant place to visit.

The one acre garden of St Peter's Church has achieved awards in the Anglia in Bloom competitions for Best Local Authority Floral Displays and in 2014 was voted best Public Park under 10 acres in the Anglia Region.

This tranquil and majestic garden in the heart of the town centre boasts attractive bedding displays, rose gardens, a sensory garden and many mature trees. The gardens were also awarded a commendation award for Innovation, with its links to the town's Merchants Trail.

The Merchants Trail is a leisurely walk around Wisbech bringing to life the many famous characters of this town and the reason why Wisbech became one of the most prosperous ports in the country during the 18th and 19th centuries. The trail can be found on our website.

Wisbech Park extends to over 12 acres and is situated in the centre of the Bowthorpe Conservation area. It has over 240 mature trees in addition to its wide open spaces and is just a five minute walk from the town centre.

Facilities include tennis courts, multi-use games area, for five-a-side and basketball, and two children's play areas. Finally a lawn bowls green completes the facilities which are available to use during the summer months.

Strolling through the park you will notice several wood sculptures carved from old tree trunks, seasonal formal bedding displays and the bandstand.

After discovering all those delights, if you still have time to spare you can browse around the shops or visit the market and produce auctions where locally grown fruit and vegetables and plants are plentiful and inexpensive. Main market days are Thursday and Saturday, in Wisbech Market place with a wide range of market traders.

Wisbech General Cemetery is maintained by volunteers 'The Friends of Wisbech General Cemetery'. The group aims to provide a place for both inviting and interesting to visitors and to restore as many of the monuments as possible while, at the same time, conserving a variety of habitats for wildlife."